Foliage

(Sample outputs generated on Ropsten Testnet)

"Foliage" is a moment of pause. The project is born from the futile attempt to catch a breath of wind, the one that no one sees but everyone notices when the leaves hang trembling. Inspired by long days near the Rio de la Plata studying the wind, this series of 625 foliage is an exploration of how angles and colors can generate the illusion of movement and harmony. "Foliage" is inspired on wind data visualizations where the use of angles and vectors speak of a trajectory. Winds, like data, travel through our world leaving a trace; this time hosted immutably on the Ethereum Blockchain.

For details of Foliage prints, see here.

An example of a vector field.

An example of visualization of wind data in Argentina. Extracted from Windy.com

As I said, "Foliage" is inspired by the area where I grew up and live. Very close to my house, a few blocks away, is the Río de la Plata, which is a very beautiful place, with lots of wind and vegetation. From that observation is that the project was born. That is why Foliage presents nine different types of plants and the name of each one is inspired by landscapes close to me.

 

The category is called surface analysis because in the study of winds you have to delimit an area where you are going to study. In my case, these are my surfaces.

Petals on my grandpa's desk

 Ropsten #80

A vegetation near a river course

Ropsten #193

Forgotten leaves on a hill

Ropsten #195

The weeds of an abandoned land

Ropsten #159

My mom's yard

Ropsten #176

The lawn of a noble garden

Ropsten #134

Some plants a few blocks from a house

Ropsten #192

Spikes from a infected plant

Ropsten #186

My neighbors vineyard Ropsten #196

Regarding the color palettes, I wanted there to be a wide variety of colors that could reflect many different moments of the year and many different moods.  In that variety, I decided to name the different color palettes following the names of the world's best known winds.

Zonda

Ropsten #2

Monzon

Ropsten #130

Tramontana

Ropsten #109

Mistral

Ropsten #116

Rashabar

Rashabar #189

Cordonazo

Ropsten #142

Puelche

Ropsten #46

Minuano

Ropsten #152

Pampero

Ropsten #168

Sirocco

Ropsten128

Levante

Ropsten #118

Bise

Ropsten #32

Alisio

Ropsten #110

Bora

Ropsten #156

Kóshkil

Ropsten #66

Poniente

Ropsten #5

Passat

Ropsten #146

Ostro

Ropsten #144

Lebeche

Ropsten #18

Gregal

Ropsten #77

Sudestada

Ropsten #138

Anime

To paint the foliage, I chose to use three techniques that I called: Random, Angle and Grid. Each uses a different technique that generates a different pattern. All the ways of coloring the foliage are based on the position and angle relationship that each leaf vector has.

Random

Ropsten #97

Angle

Ropsten #145

Grid

Ropsten #16

Each foliage can have different styles. I separated them into five different styles: Shady, Magic, Clean, Veins and Anime.

The "Shady" style has more depth through shadow work that creates volume. In "Magic" the color palette is inverted to color the edges of the leaves, which makes it more vibrant and colorful.In the "Veins" style the border of the leaves can be black or white and this disappears as the leaves scale, while in "Clean" there is no border at all, which at times makes the colors lose their borders. The "Anime" style is quite different and alludes to something mystical.

Shady

Ropsten #19

Magic

Ropsten #120

Veins

Ropsten #54

Clean

Ropsten #162

Anime

Finally, as the wind blows, the foliage may release more or less pollen, depending on their characteristics. There may be a lot or a light amount of pollen, or no pollen at all.

Off

Ropsten #167

Light

Ropsten #153

Hard

Ropsten #29